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Bibliographie

Autor:  
Alle :: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, J, K, L, M, N, O, Ö, P, R, S, T, U, V, W, Y, Z 
Alle :: Langlois, ... , Lübcke, Lister, Loch, ... , Lykogianni 
Referenzen
Langlois, Tony
Can You Feel It? DJs and House Music Culture in the UK
Popular Music, 11(2):229-238
1992

Schlüsselwörter: House music, youth music culture, disk jockeys

Zusammenfassung:

In this article Langlois explores the work of disk jockeys involved in the UK ‘House’ club scene. His aim is to examine how a popular music genre like ‘House’ could develop a remarkable following without involving traditional attractions such as ‘stars’, performers or ‘groups’ to admire and no manifest stance adopted in relation to mainstream lifestyles. The genre usually does not involve visible musicians, lyrical content or individual personalities to relate to. Langlois considers this to be unusual, as the music business normally operates with marketable aspects such as musical virtuosity, sexuality and rebelliousness. Therefore he concludes that a shift of meaning had occurred in the activity of mass dancing to records during the late 1980s creating a new and central role for disk jockeys. He states that ‘House’ is different to previous manifestations of youth culture or at least not explained adequately by existing literature on popular music. Raising questions such as how the music fits into regular channels of popular music marketing and what it communicates, Langlois focuses on the DJs activities. He elaborates on DJs constituting themselves simultaneously as performers, marketers and composers of the music. Furthermore DJs are described as playing a key role in the ‘House’ scene, as they transform from a passive ‘record player’ to (virtual) musician giving ‘House’ events their significance. Yet DJs rarely court attention during their performances but tend to remain in the background and despite international success do not have star status. Langlois emphasises that ‘House’ music events, in advertising often referred to as ‘dreamlike’ or ‘super natural’, generate a liminal experience that separates the ordinary world from the dance environment. Here the ideal effect of the music means becoming emotionally involved with it to the extent of the ability to physically feel it. The DJ and the audience engage in a relationship in which the DJ responds to the crowd’s mood and the audience is moved by the DJs music. Langlois states that it is this reciprocal relationship that makes raves ‘special’ events allowing participants to become emotionally involved with the music. The author comes to the conclusion that folk and academic histories of popular music tend to focus on traditional concepts of musicality that emphasise star qualities and musicality. However, recorded/transmitted forms of music have more cultural significance than life performances, such as collaborations between musicians, studio engineers and record producers. Langlois states that the significance of recorded/transmitted music in the 1990s should be appreciated as popular forms with new concepts of musicality, authenticity and performance that develop and influence technology mediated music throughout the world.

Lanz, Stephan
Berlin aufgemischt: Abendländisch, multikulturell, kosmopolitisch? Die politische Konstruktion einer Einwanderungsstadt: Dissertation
aus Urban studies
Transcript, Bielefeld
2007

Schlüsselwörter: Berlin, migration, integration, city planning, racism

Zusammenfassung:

In this book Lanz analyzes the history and presence of (constructions) of the migration city Berlin while looking at dominant political and social discourses on integration and multiculturalism that are mostly based on fixed concepts of nation, culture and constructions of the own and the other. Furthermore interviews with leading politicians of Berlin form a relevant part of the author's analysis. He shows how the development of the city and the dominant society drawing boundaries towards migrants influence each other while offering a historical contextualization. Lanz mentions a gradually developing acknowledgement of migration as a reality, at least on an urban level. He aims at tracing how the political and academic drawing of boundaries has determined the position of migration in the past and present. While looking at the past 300 years of migration policies Lanz shows continuities regarding restrictive institutional practices towards migration and argues that these practices as well as the discourses underlying them are based on racism. The author examines the development of integration discourses marking integration as a void after the fall of the Berlin wall and their reinforcement throughout the 90s towards ghetto discourses and notions of 'the failure of integration'. He goes on by looking at business oriented city politics and city marketing increasingly being oriented towards subcultures as well as signs of a new tendency within migration politics that considers improved participation as a state interest. However, the reality of (institutional) racism is continued to be ignored in these developments. Lanz analyzes the city development of Berlin while taking racism and research on migration into consideration. Though he concludes that there is a trend towards the acknowledgement of the reality of migration he is cautious of this, as racist discourses on 'the failure of integration' remain highly present as well as dominant notions revolving around assimilation demands are still implemented into political programs.

Lapeyronnie, Didier und Courtois, Laurent
Ghetto urbain: Ségrégation, violence, pauvreté en France aujourd'hui
aus Le monde comme il va
Laffont, Paris
2008

Schlüsselwörter: social disadvantage, ghetto, France, urban organization, class

Zusammenfassung:

According to Lapeyronnie, the current social reality of the disadvantaged French urban peripheries allows the use of the term “ghetto”. Urban violence, police brutality, increasing discrimination and social alienation are structural features of the poor banlieues. However, a ghetto is not exclusively a place of poverty and segregation, but requires a positive definition in order to be defined as such, a form of internal coherence. Therefore, for the author, French outskirts have developed particular modes of collective organisation, economy and culture. In other words, the ghetto results from the combination of an “external construction” – social and racial discrimination – and an “internal construction” – as its inhabitants produce a specific subculture. On the one hand, poor boroughs tend to become increasingly self-referential and closed, also via the development of informal economies. On the other hand, this process of exclusion is linked to authorities’ conservative and xenophobic policies, while social groups attempt to defend themselves by drawing barriers toward the outside. In several French cities, social strata tend to organise hierarchies reflecting a class-biased appropriation of space: people limit their daily lives to specific neighbourhoods but do not experience the city as a whole. Moreover, the most disadvantaged neighbourhoods are located at the intersection of class and racial discrimination: according to Lapeyronnie, urban exclusion is also a mark of neo-colonial relationships. The same categories of exclusion that define the ghetto have come to operate within it: relationships are racialised and sexualised hence social ties weaken. In spite of being segregated from the social structure, the ghetto carries social and cultural significance, at least for its inhabitants. This book aims to describe the French ghetto in terms of agency instead of focusing on structure: a qualitative analysis of people’s discourses allows understanding meanings and intentionalities of life within its perimeter. This book pays attention to social representations held by the inhabitants of Belingrad, a small city of 150.000. For the author, such a qualitative analysis points to the culture of the ghetto in order to support the argument that French ghettos are now culturally and economically autonomous features of long-term processes of marginalisation.

Layoun, Mary N.
Wedded to the Land?: Gender, Boundaries, and Nationalism in Crisis
Duke University Press,
2001

Schlüsselwörter: Post-Contemporary Interventions / Latin America in Translation

Zusammenfassung:

Offers a commentary on the idea of nationalism in general and on specific attempts to formulate alternatives to the concept. Drawing on readings of literature and of official documents and decrees with exiles and refugees, this book uses various historical incidents as a means of highlighting a recurring trope within constructs of nationalism.

Löw, Martina
Soziologie der Städte
Suhrkamp, Frankfurt am Main
2008

Schlüsselwörter: City Marketing, Berlin, Munich, cityscapes, urban sociology

Zusammenfassung:

Martina Löw’s Book “Sociology of the cities” investigates the peculiar logics of different cities. Löw tries to cover the complexity and variety cities such as New York and London, Berlin and Munich offer, but mainly focuses on German cities. What are the distinctions between the cities? What are the reasons for the different perceptions of cities? At first Löw reviews how cities increasingly developed into subjects of interest in social science, theory and methods. She explains, from a sociological point of view, why and how cities and their inhabitants are labelled with specific characteristics. Thereby the author follows the question what commonalities and distinctions cities as subjects of social science demonstrate. Here she refers to items such as globalization, cityscapes and rivalry. Do cities lose their specific local qualities in the course of globalization processes? How do cities represent themselves with their unique features? Questions as such are more clarified in the fourth chapter on townscapes and the differentiation between a city as a constructed image, namely the architecture in the city, and a graphical image created by image campaigns and tourist marketed pictures. Löw's main argument is that every city has a specific constructed image that reveals the unique character of the city. Moreover this artificial and constructed image is highly present in people’s general imagination of the city, as inhabitants and tourists permanently and simultaneously consume city images through advertisement. A concrete comparison between Berlin, Germany’s capital city, and Munich, the so-called ‘hidden capital city”, make these arguments livelier. The comparison demonstrates the interdependency of text and image in reference to the image campaigns and advertising posters of the respective cities. Both image campaigns use different emotional connotations in order to describe the character of the city and inhabitants’ attitudes towards life. The book concludes that one has to pay attention to various aspects to understand a city and its specifics from a sociological point of view. For Löw, sociology of cities needs to be brought forward and developed. It has to incorporate city sights, architectural distinctions and politics as well as logics of everyday life, such as how inhabitants use live and see the city. All these factors have an effect on the specific image a city provides.

Löw, Martina
Raumsoziologie
Suhrkamp, Frankfurt am Main
2007

Wensierski, Hans-Jürgen von und Lübcke, Claudia
Junge Muslime in Deutschland. Lebenslagen, Aufwachsprozesse und Jugendkulturen.
Verlag Barbara Budrich, Opladen
2007

Schlüsselwörter: young Muslims, Germany, youth culture, migration studies, host society, life worlds

Zusammenfassung:

This anthology aims to document and discuss the current state of research concerning the juvenile phase of Muslims in Germany from different angles and to see young Muslims as a self-evident part of a pluralistic youth population in Germany. The authors emphasize the diversity of Muslim everyday culture in Germany, including the constrained scopes of action and possibilities as relevant magnitude of influence. The anthologists defend their category of ‘young Muslims’ as reasonable as it subsumes common life worlds and similar socialization experiences this specific group of young people undergoes. The book presents sixteen different contributions, presented in six sections: “Basics”, “Orientations of young Muslims”, “Religion and religiosity” in the life worlds of young Muslims, “Socialization and education”, “Life concepts and youth culture” and finally “social problems”. Beside analyses of social structures and relevant studies of the youth and migration studies connected to the current subject, the authors also present qualitative studies, including biographical or reconstructive studies, which reflect a differentiated picture of young Muslims’ life worlds in Germany. As a conclusion, the authors do not want to build the usual dichotomy asking if migrants orientate themselves to the society of origin or host society, they rather take the view that, based on empirical findings, it is time to accept an integrative concept that stands for a “as well as”; accordingly migrants can orientate themselves to the society of origin as well as the host/ receiving society.

Hadfield, Phil , Hobbs, Dick , Lister, Stuart und Winlow, Simon
Bouncers. Violence and Governance in the Night-time Economy.
Oxford University Press, New York
2003

Loch, Dietmar
Jugendliche maghrebinischer Herkunft zwischen Stadtpolitik und Lebenswelt: Eine Fallstudie in der französischen Vorstadt Vaulx-en-Velin
VS Verlag, Wiesbaden
2005

Schlüsselwörter: Vaulx-en-Velin Maghrebinischer Jugendlicher Lebenswelt Kommunalpolitik


Loch, Dietmar
Jugendliche maghrebinischer Herkunft zwischen Stadtpolitik und Lebenswelt: Eine Fallstudie in der französischen Vorstadt Vaulx-en-Velin
VS Verlag, Wiesbaden
2005

Schlüsselwörter: Vaulx-en-Velin Maghrebinischer Jugendlicher Lebenswelt Kommunalpolitik


Low, Setha M. und Smith, Neil
The Imperative of Public Space: Introduction
In Setha M. Low und Neil Smith, Editor, The Politics of Public Space
Seite 1-16.
Routledge,
2006

Schlüsselwörter: public space, private space, politics, public sphere, spatiality, neoliberalism

Zusammenfassung:

The introduction to this volume discusses the geographical, cultural and historical characteristics of repoliticized public space in order to open up the possibility of a new politics of public space. Setha M. Low and Neil Smith show how today’s politics of public space, under the influence of neoliberalism, combine a transformation of and control over public space with the sharpening of social differences based on gender, national citizenship, race, and class. ‘Public space’ thus refers to a variety of social locations which include institutional or electronic spaces. In spite of its formal openness/publicness (as opposed to private space), Low and Smith give attention to the segregation of public space. The ideal ‘public sphere’, according to Habermas and others, implies universality instead of spatiality/fragmentation. However, the neoliberal public sphere relates to public space in that, for example, it includes privatized elements (e.g. media, travel on planes or railways) which also form public space. Today’s urban public spaces, the authors argue, are increasingly policed and surveilled. Moreover, the nation state both circumscribes the public sphere and regulates private space (e.g. social reproduction, zoning laws). In addition, Low and Smith present the various essays of this volume: David Harvey examines the relationship between public space and the politics of the public sphere; Dolores Hayden focuses on suburbanization; the contribution by Elizabeth Blackmar analyzes the property rights discourse; Setha Low looks at gated communities as privatized ‘public space’; Cindy Katz considers control over children in public and privatized space; Ashley Dawson examines security fears and crime in Post-Apartheid South Africa; and Don Mitchell and Lynn Staeheli focus on exclusionary practices concerning the homeless in the center of San Diego.

Low, Setha M.
The Edge and the Center: Gated Communities and the Discourse of Urban Fear
American Anthropologist, 103(1):45-58
2001

Zusammenfassung:

Across America, middle-class and upper-middle-class gated communities are creating new forms of exclusion and residential segregation, exacerbating social cleavages that already exist (Blakely and Snyder 1997; Higley 1995; Lang and Danielson 1997; Marcuse 1997). While historically secured and gated communities were built in the United States to protect estates and to contain the leisure world of retirees, these urban and suburban developments now target a much broader market, including families with children (Guterson 1992; Lofland 1998). This retreat to secured enclaves with walls, gates, and guards materially and symbolically contradicts American ethos and values, threatens public access to open space, and creates yet another barrier to social interaction, building of social networks, as well as increased tolerance of diverse cultural/ racial/social groups (Davis 1992;Devine 1996;Etzoni 1995; Judd 1995; McKenzie 1994). In this paper, I explore how the discourse of fear of violence and crime and the search for a secure community by those who live in gated communities in the United States legitimates and rationalizes class-based exclusion strategies and residential segregation. I examine whether residents of cities experiencing increasing cultural diversity are fleeing neighborhoods because they have experienced a "loss of place" and therefore feel unsafe and insecure (Altaian and Low 1992). Some people are responding to this loss by choosing to buy into a defensive space, a walled and guarded community that they can call home, [gated communities, United States, urban fear]

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